Monday 5th November

The Sheepdogs

19:00 - 22:30 | £15.00

Crosstown Concerts Presents:

The Sheepdogs 

Live at Borderline, Soho


For a new album that The Sheepdogs didn’t initially set out to make, Changing Colours is a stunning achievement. Proud purveyors of guitar-driven modern-day retro rock, the triple Juno Award-winning Saskatoon-based quintet has expanded its sound on Changing Colours to encompass more styles and hues to enhance the Sheepdogs’ trademark beef-and-boogie twin-axe riffs, hooks, shuffles and long-haired aesthetic. “We identify strongly with rock ‘n roll, but there’s definitely some branching out,” says Ewan Currie, The Sheepdogs’ singer, guitarist, songwriter and occasional – and yes, you’re reading this correctly – clarinetist. “The sounds we use on this – there’s more keyboards featuring Shamus and more stringed instruments.

It’s still rock ‘n roll but there are more colours.” It’s also great, passionate music born out of spontaneity: first resonating in the 17-song album’s euphoric opener “Nobody” and continuing to flavour such invigorating numbers as the electrifying “Saturday Night” and the driving “I’ve Got A Hole Where My Heart Should Be,” the record’s infectious first single. But The Sheepdogs haven’t only stretched their sonic palate: they’ve also expanded stylistically, tastefully embracing other genres as well. There’s the country-lite feel of “Let It Roll,” the Stax-soul aura of the mid-tempo anthem “I Ain’t Cool” that features trombone — and the resplendent Latin-rock vibe that fuels “The Big Nowhere.” This is what occurs when The Sheepdogs are left to their own devices:

When the band completed its global responsibilities in promoting its fifth album, 2015’s Future Nostalgia, the band took a busman’s holiday, renting Toronto’s Taurus Studio and hiring its owner, Thomas D’Arcy, to engineer and co-produce whatever emerged from their creative loins. “It was very low key,” says Currie. “We didn’t have a clock. We would work until we were bored or tired. Then we would stop.” Drummer Sam Corbett said the music that eventually evolved into Changing Colours benefitted from the relaxed approach. “Most of the records we’ve made have been under a short time constraint,” Corbett explains. “This one was done over six months, with some songs sitting around for two months. Then we’d come back and try different things, so I think that as a result, some of the songs took a different shape. “

Tickets will go on sale on Friday the 27th of April at 9am via TicketWeb.
14+ (under 16s must be accompanied by an adult)

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